The Iron Lady_Jim Broadbent, Meryl Streep bue crepe_Image credit Pathé-1 © 2011 Lord Christopher Laverty. All rights reserved.

Meryl Streep in Costume for The Iron Lady Trailer

More straightforward clip than teaser trailer, but worth checking out anyway – surely you must be curious to know if Meryl Streep has nailed the accent? She certainly looks the part.

It is appropriate that our first ‘action’ glimpse of Streep’s Margaret Thatcher shows her wearing blue, albeit light which she tended to favour less, as this colour represents the Conservative party (i.e. her political allegiance). Costume designer for The Iron Lady is Consolata Boyle, who was Oscar nominated for her work on The Queen (2006). While costume design is not historical re-enactment, there will obviously need to be a certain level of real life authenticity in place here, as with any biopic.

The Guardian has the exclusive.

And now the full trailer is available too. Lots of immaculate jackets, twin sets and shoulder pads (14/11/12):

Amusing, Thatcher’s comment about her pearls, as they were generally omnipresent. The hats too she never really left behind. Margaret Thatcher was considered something of a style icon in her day, and even now is seen as representative of 1980s ‘power dressing’. Most of her clothes were made by British heritage firm Aquascutum. Her shoes, sometimes by Salvatore Ferragamo, were black court and low-heel.

Of course, Thatcher’s most famous outfit was a two-piece suit in royal blue wool crepe (Aquascutum), and she often mixed and matched the jacket with different length skirts. It was worn during her first term as Prime Minister, coming to symbolise the ‘Iron Lady’ moniker adopted for the film’s title. If Margaret Thatcher does not define power dressing, then with her padded shoulder jackets and slim pencil skirts, she certainly personified it.

The Iron Lady (directed by Phyllida Lloyd) is due for release on 16th December in the U.S. and 6th of January in the UK. Meryl Streep may or may not be collecting her Best Actress award a few months later.

© 2011 – 2014, Lord Christopher Laverty.